5390efc8517387ce3711dcf69507ec68An insight into the upcoming Beats Music service: it won’t be pumping details of every track users play to Facebook.

That’s according to a personal blog post by CEO Ian Rogers, sparked by one too many of his Facebook contacts mistaking his daughter’s Sonos-via-Mog streams for his own tastes (i.e. Taylor Swift). It seems Rogers’ concerns about ‘frictionless’ Facebook sharing go further back though.

“This feature was always a bad idea. It’s as if Instagram uploaded every photo you take with your phone,” he writes. “I can’t wait for music services to stop doing this by default. I promise you Beats Music will not do the ‘barf everything you play on Facebook’ bullshit. If your music service is currently barfing every track you play to Facebook, turn that shit off.” He even provides instructions on how to do it for a range of services.

The serious point here: an ongoing move to smarter forms of sharing, with services understanding which friends (or, indeed, strangers) people share tastes with, then aggregating their habits in a smarter way to provide recommendations.

Less about barfing every song you play to Facebook, and more about ‘this album/artist is bubbling up among the friends and tastemakers whose opinion matters to you’. Apps like Soundwave, Twitter #Music and Discovr are exploring those ideas, as are other streaming services.